Signal:A secure client to use for your communication

I have been using this nice application, called Signal for quiet a long time now.It was actually a tweet from Edward Snowden that convinced me to use it.

I never had any problems and has replaced whatsapp and other apps for most of my communications with friends and family.

Signal is a messaging app, just like WhatsApp or iMessage or Facebook Messenger, but one that’s geared towards privacy and security rather than cute emoji stickers. In fact, so good are its security measures that even Edward Snowden recommends it—and he should know which apps are the best for stopping unwanted snooping.

Signal is free to use and available for Android, iOS, and Chrome (a browser extension that links with your phone), and alongside the extra security protocols, it includes all of the basic messaging tools you’re going to need, including read receipts, emoji support, group chats, and voice and video calls. There is also a Windows client that you can download and use for your daily communication.

First and foremost, because it protects your chats. Anything you send or receive is encrypted, which makes it very hard for anyone who intercepts the data to work out what’s being said unless they are the specified recipient. What’s more, Signal doesn’t store any user data, so governments and other agencies can’t request it, and it can’t leak out.

On top of that, all the code is open source, which means anyone can look at how the app is written—that doesn’t mean hackers can break Signal’s encryption (which is virtually uncrackable), but it does mean security experts and users can check that Signal is maintaining the high privacy standards that it says it is.